Institute for Telecommunication Sciences
the research laboratory of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration

ITS: The Nation’s Spectrum and Communications Lab

Our mission is to ADVANCE innovation in communications technologies, INFORM spectrum and communications policy for the benefit of all stakeholders, and INVESTIGATE our Nation’s most pressing telecommunications challenges through research that employees are proud to deliver. Learn more about ITS on our YouTube Channel or read about our research programs in the Technical Progress Report.

 

August 18, 2020

Presentations from the ISART 2020, the International Symposium on Advanced Radio Technologies: 5G Spectrum and a Zero-Trust Network are now available on the ...

April 2, 2020

The Open, Public, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act, signed into law on January 14, 2019, requires federal agencies to publish their information online as open data, using standardized, machine-readable...

May 9, 2019

ITS has a long history of leadership in air-to-ground propagation model development within the International Telecommunications Union – Radiocommunication Sector’s (ITU-R) Study Group 3 – Radiowave Propagation (and its...

March 10, 2019

How can we get more use out of the radio spectrum? One way is by sharing radio bands between users who have never shared before. Consider radio frequencies near 3.5 GHz. Until recently, that part of the spectrum was...

November 26, 2018

Behind every initiative to share spectrum are models of how radio waves in a particular band propagate through different environments. How far will a signal travel before it becomes too faint to be useful or...

New Publications

This Month in ITS History

April 1950: Boulder Chamber of Commerce Begins Fundraising to Attract CRPL

On April 11, 1950, the citizens of the city of Boulder, Colorado kicked off a campaign to raise money to guarantee the Department of Commerce’s new laboratory would be built in the city. With the help of Senator Ed Johnson (D-CO) and Ed Condon, the director of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), Boulder had been chosen to house the new NBS lab in December of the previous year. But the decision was based in part on the promise that land for the labs would be supplied by the City. The Chamber of Commerce started a newspaper advertising campaign in April that compared donated money to insurance premiums. “For a premium of $70,000 the community is assured a $2,000,000 annual dividend in the form of payroll and employment opportunities,” the ads promised. Within nine days the citizens and businesses of Boulder and surrounding communities had raised $93,629.58, easily surpassing their goal. The Radio Building, where ITS is still located, was completed in 1954 and dedicated by President Eisenhower on September 13. The citizens of Boulder received even higher dividends on the money they invested than the advertising had promised: by 1959 the lab's payroll was injecting over $4 million into the area’s economy and attracting visiting scientists from around the world. Boulder's current reputation as a center of scientific and technical innovation with a strong startup economy owes much to the researchers who have been attracted to Boulder over the years by the presence of NBS, ITS, other Commerce and federal laboratories, and the University.